Rapid Transit vs. Local Buses- Station Features



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In November 2013, the Montgomery County Council unanimously approved plans for a Rapid Transit System, or RTS, a high-quality transit system that can be built for a fraction of the cost of Metro.

The complete transit system will have 10 routes with limited stops. The County is beginning studies to determine the best way to implement this high-quality transit system and integrate it with Metro, the Corridor Cities Transitway, the Purple Line, and existing RideOn services. Unlike standard bus stops, RTS vehicles and stations utilize many features that make it more similar to light rail or Metro than local bus service.

What makes RTS stations and vehicles different from local buses? Find out in the video here!

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What Rapid Transit Looks Like



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On November 26, 2013, the Montgomery County Council approved the Countywide Transit Corridors Functional Master Plan. After five years of study and two months of committee worksessions, the Council officially decided to set aside road space for Rapid Transit on ten routes (81 miles), including Route 355 and Route 29, plus the already-approved Corridor Cities Transitway (CCT), totaling almost 100 miles.

Here, Communities for Transit shows you what the Rapid Transit System may look like on Montgomery County's roads.

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MoCo News

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At the RTS Steering Committee meeting on Tuesday, MCDOT's Tom Pogue explained the county's plan to integrate the Citizen Advisory Group amendment in the approved Countywide Transit Corridors Functional Master Plan. The five initial advisory groups would correspond to the initial BRT corridors being studied: MD 355 North, MD 355 South, US 29, MD 97, and MD 586. Each advisory group will be made up of 10-15 members representing individuals familiar with the corridor, residents, businesses, and individuals with a county-wide perspective. Priority will be given to the first three types.

Beginning in May of this year, MCDOT will begin to solicit members for the groups and nomination forms will be made available. Selection panels will be established for each corridor, and all members will be finalized by July 1, after which the groups will meet quarterly. The BRT advisory committees will send all matters to the design team for their respective corridors who will then use the corridor perspectives in determining all design matters.

Keep following Communities for Transit to learn when the Open House to discuss these groups will be held and when nominations will begin to be accepted.


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Image source: APTA
 
AROUND HERE
The good:
The Purple Line gains the equivalent of federal approval; next step: groundbreaking.
MARC just began weekend service last December, and now it's increasing capacity between Baltimore and DC.
 
The bad:
A recent study shows nearly 6000 natural gas leaks in the District's pipelines. How should DC respond to its aging infrastructure?
A hidden height limit holds back affordable mid-rise construction in the District.
Montgomery's proposed budget takes transit funding and gives it to wealthy homeowners.
DC takes a step backward on the one dedicated bus lane it was actively planning.
 
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The debate continues for a dedicated bus lane on busy 16th Street.
Dedicated bus lanes on 16th Street are a win for everyone.
 
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On Wednesday, February 26, Communities for Transit and the Coalition for Smarter Growth debuted a new public meeting format during our Silver Spring Rapid Transit Open House. The meeting, attended by 44 local residents, contained a short presentation with videos to show different road treatment options and station features.  Following the presentation, attendees were invited to visit different kiosks around the room, where eight large information boards were placed, in order to learn more and ask questions about the matters of RTS that were most important to them. The Seventh State blogger, David Lublin, describes his take on the Open House and the RTS plan, including our new RTS Map, designed like the WMATA Metro Map.

Read full article.


As part of Obama's 2015 budget, $100 million in federal construction money in the next fiscal year was recommended for Maryland's Purple Line. This federal money marks a “critical financial milestone” that can keep the Purple Line's plan on schedule. The budget also includes seven large transit projects around the country that the Federal Transit Administration recommended for a “full funding grant agreement” to help pay to construct the projects.

Read full article.


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A poll commissioned by the Coalition for Smarter Growth shows that 71 percent of Montgomery County voters support the Council-approved RTS. The poll asked once at the beginning and once at the end whether the poll-takers supported or opposed the Rapid Transit System in Montgomery County. 78 percent agreed that the RTS “promotes the right kind of development by supporting walkable communities with mixed residential & commercial spaces along major commercial corridors like Rockville Pike.” 80 percent agreed that the plan is the most affordable transportation option for the county. "Out of 400 Montgomery County voters that Mason-Dixon surveyed by phone, 71% support the BRT plan and 22% oppose it after hearing common arguments from naysayers and supporters alike."

Read full article.


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